Executive and Team Coaching

Learning from Each Other

“Our work provides people the opportunity and a forum to share their experiences and learn from each other. We acknowledge the strengths of the individuals on the team and then build on those strengths.”

Jan Petty, Principal

Case Study 1:
Executive Level Team Not Meeting Expectations

Issue
A senior level executive at a Fortune 500 company contacted TCP because her executive level team wasn’t meeting her expectations. She asked us to coach the team through a strategic planning session and identify problems with their team processes.

Resolution
We began by interviewing the executive team leader about her team and why she felt they weren’t meeting her expectations. While facilitating the strategic planning process, we discovered communication problems among the team members as well as differences in understanding roles and responsibilities. Using the Birkman Method, we helped the team members better understand themselves and each other. They then set ground rules for working together and defined roles and responsibilities with guidance from us. After working with the team, we coached the team leader individually on communicating to her team a new, higher level of accountability based on the roles and responsibilities and the strategic plan. The executive also learned how to work effectively with each team member.

Success
The team learned to deal with issues directly and openly. They became more productive and happier because they knew where they stood with their co-workers and their leader. The team leader gained an understanding of her employees as individuals as well as how to help them succeed professionally.

Case Study 2:
Not a Good Fit with the Organization

Issue
An executive in a large corporation has been told she’s not a good fit with the organization. While her performance is satisfactory, others find her difficult to work with. The company didn’t want to lose a valuable employee and contacted us to coach the executive.

Resolution
We began by performing interviews with everyone this person worked with — employees, peers and superiors. We then coached the executive around determining the organization’s expectations versus what she was delivering. It became clear the executive didn’t feel connected to her work. To help her see how to become more connected, we coached her through defining her life purpose, core attributes and key skills and abilities. The executive discovered her job required only a few of her key skills and abilities. Using the Birkman Method, she came to understand the environment she needed to be most effective and found that her current working environment was a source of stress. We helped the executive develop a short-term strategy to minimize stress, and she then was able to search for a better fit within the organization.

Success
The executive found a position within the company that is more fulfilling and in alignment with her skills and abilities. She is happier, more productive and easy to work with in her new position. The company retained a key asset and increased her job satisfaction.

Case Study 3:
Interpersonal Issues Among Staff

Issue
A regional sales office for a large corporation contacted us because they were experiencing interpersonal issues among the secretarial staff. There were four sales managers and six secretaries. Each sales manager had at least one secretary, and each secretary reported to a different sales manager. As part of the information gathering process, we performed interviews with everyone involved to assess the strengths and weaknesses in the office.

We discovered no unified office structure and no strong leadership. There was a poor match of interests and strengths with tasks. This resulted in conflict because the individuals were not performing functions they enjoyed. With no unifying leadership, there was no one to help settle disagreements.

Resolution
Based on the initial interviews and information gathering, we recommended Team Coaching for the group of secretaries. The first step was to utilize the Birkman Method. This tool helps individuals better understand themselves and others, as well as appreciate the differences among them. Using the results of the Birkman Method, we helped the group form a self-directed team. They assigned functions based on individual interests and talents. Even after the formal coaching process, the team continues to re-organize the office based on talents and interests as the group or functions change. “We strive to not only coach individuals and teams but also to teach them to coach themselves so they can continue to grow and develop,” says Jan Petty, Principal.

Success
Once individuals began performing jobs they enjoyed, the team functioned more productively. This resulted in less conflict and disagreement and a harmonious working environment.